General NewsLatest

Revealed: In-Depth History Behind The Agogo Stool

Agogo is a town about fifty-two miles from Kumasi, the capital of Asante. Agogo is the administrative capital of Asante Akyem North Municipal. The Agogohene owes allegiance to the Golden Stool and swears to the Asantehene with the Mponponsuo sword. The Agogohene prior to his elevation to paramount status was forbidden by tradition to call at the king’s palace without passing through one of the Abrempon chiefs resident in Kumasi. The Agogohene was elevated to the status of a Paramount chief or Omanhene by the Ghana Government on the 19th August 1960.

The Agogo stool is one of matrilineal descent and has an Abusua, or classificatory system as Aduana and It’s a hereditary stool. The Agogo people are said, migrated from Nyanoase, a town near Nsawam in the Eastern region of present-day Ghana.

It is said that Nana Ofori Krobon was a sub chief of the Akwamuhene, Ansah Sasaraku. During the reign of this powerful ruler, Ansah Sasaraku, a war broke out between the Akwamus and the people of Accra. The Accra chief at that time was Okai Kwei.

The people of Accra is said to have won a victory over the Akwamus and there was a state of unrest amongst the neighbouring towns and villages. So Ofori Krobon, a sub-chief of Akwamuhene, left the area of Akwamu and settled at a place called Osateneso in the Afram plans with a very large retinue. It is said that on their arrival these plains were entirely uninhabited.

Whilst at the village of Osateneso, Ofori Krobon heard of Atara Firam, the head chief of Dwan (Guan), who was said to be a very powerful ruler and was supposed to be the overlord of the present area of Agogo and other adjacent areas, right up to the present northern region of Ghana.

It so happened that a war ensued between Ofori Krobon and Atara Firam as a result of a dispute that arose between the subjects of Ofori Krobon and a subject of Atara Firam. This quarrel, which led to a great war, was due to the fact that a servant of Nana Ofori Krobon was met during his hunting in Agogo by a servant of Nana Atara Firam, who reported this trespass to Atara Firam who at that time claimed to be the overlord of all the land that stretches to the north. Nana Atara Firam ordered the arrest of this servant of chief Ofori Krobon and further summoned him to appear before him in Council. Nana Ofori Krobon, considering the situation to be one of the serious consequences, refused to allow his subject to respond to Atara Firam’s summons.

War, therefore, broke out. Nana Ofori Krobon sought reinforcements from his brothers, namely Kumawuhene Effa Kai and Kwamanhene Ntori Nimpa of the Aduana clan who were originally from Esumegya. It will be recalled that Nana Ofori Krobon had departed with his brothers at Asantemanso where he had taken refuge at Nyanoase, as a result of a dispute that arose amongst the Aduana people. So Nana Atara Finam and his subjects took to their heels and fled across the river Volta.

After the defeat of Atara Firam Nana Ofori Krobon became the overlord of the present Agogo area. There was also a distribution of lands and war booty amongst these Aduana chiefs, namely Agogohene, Kumawuhene, and Kwamanhene. It will be recalled that the battlefield of this war was at Gyamborafa, an area at present-day Atebubu where Atara Firam is said to have been defeated.

The area in question was a Savannah land near Krachi. Prior to the defeat of Atara Firam by the Aduana chiefs, the present area was known as Agogowa, named after a river called Agogowa which flows in the middle of the present town of Agogo. It is said that after the defeat of Atara Firam Nana Ofori Kobon and his people wished to find a suitable place for permanent residence since they were hemmed in the Afram Plains. During the course of their migration, they came across this river of Agogowa and thought to themselves that the banks of this river would be a suitable place for settlement.

So they settled there and thus brought about the name of Agogo, meaning the side of the river Agogowa which is suitable for residence. It is said that at the time of their migration from the Afram plains to Agogo, Nana Obiri Yeboah of Kwaman. Present-day Kumasi. Nana Ofori Kobon, it is said was still the reigning chief of the Agogo people. It is said that at this time Nana Ofori Kobon was an independent chief and there was no relationship between Kumasi and Agogo.

The Agogohene, it is said, was no subordinate chief to the Kumasi people. So the Agogo people did not, of course, take part in the war between Nana Obiri Yeboah and the Dormaas which took place at Suntresu in Kumasi. It is said that during the reign of Osei Tutu almost all the tributary states decided to join together to crush the Denkyirahene who menaced the community.

During the Denkyira war with Ntim Gyakari Nana Ofori Kobon had been succeeded on the

 

 

stool by Okan, his brother. The Agogohene, it is said, took part in the Denkyira war in which Ntim Gyakari was defeated at Feyiase. Some of the war captives, it is said, were sent to Agogo and served the Agogohene as his Daabifoɔ (servants responsible for the dressing and keeping tidy of Agogohene’ s bed). It is said that after the war with Ntim Gyakari, the Denkyirahene, the Alliance between Kumasi and Agogo continued and the occupant of the Agogo stool from that time paid homage to the occupant of the Golden Stool.

Okan was succeeded on the stool by Kwasi Tutu, his brother, in the reign of Asantehene Nana Opoku Ware I. This chief, it is said, went to the Takyiman war along with other chiefs, when Ameyaw, the Takyiman chief, was defeated and beheaded by the Asante. Nana Kwasi Tutu was succeeded on the stool by Nana Kyei Panin in the reign of Asantehene Kusi Bodom.  Kyei Panin was a nephew of Kwasi Tutu. Kyei Panin was succeeded on the stool by Nana Toku in the reign of Asantehene Osei Kwadwo, the great fighting king who fought in the broad daylight.

Nana Toku was succeeded on the stool by Akumanin Awere, a brother of Nana Toku. Nana Akumanin Awere was succeeded on the stool by Nana Darkwa, his brother, in the reign of Asantehene Osei Yaw Akoto. The Agogohene, Nana Darkwa, was said to have taken part in the battle in the Akatamansu war. Nana Darkwa was succeeded on the stool by Nana Ntekurah. He was a nephew of Darkwa. Nana Ntekurah was succeeded on the stool by Amoako Panin, his brother. Amoako Panin was succeeded on the stool by Tudu, a nephew of Amoako Panin. Tudu was succeeded on the stool by Amoako II. He was destooled for maladministration in the reign of Nana Agyeman, alias Nana Kwaku Duah I. Nana Amoako II was a brother of Nana Tudu.

Nana Amoako II was succeeded by Asamoah Yaw, his brother, in the reign of Asantehene Nana Mensah Bonsu. He was destooled for maladministration. Asamoah Yaw was succeeded by Kofi Amponsa in the first part of the reign of King Prempeh I before his exile to the Seychelles Island. He was destooled for maladministration.

Kofi Amponsa was succeeded on the stool by Kwaku Kyei, his brother, during the Yaa Asantewaa war of 1900. He died on the battlefield. Kofi Amponsa was then reinstated whilst King Prempeh I was in exile. He was once again destooled. Kofi Amponsa was succeeded by Kofi Ackah. He spent forty days on the stool and was destooled for maladministration.

He was destooled whilst Asantehene Nana Prempeh I was still in exile. Kofi Ackah was succeeded by Kwadwo Agyekum, a nephew of Kofi Ackah, whilst King Prempeh I was still in exile. He was destooled for maladministration. Kwadwo Agyekum was succeeded by Kwabena Asamoah, a brother of Kwadwo Agyekum, whilst King Prempeh was still in Seychelles Island.

He was destooled for maladministration. Kwabena Asamoah was succeeded by Kwasi Amoako when Asantehene Prempeh I had retired from Seychelles. He was destooled for maladministration. Kwadwo Agyekum was then reinstated, but he was once again destooled in the second part of the reign of King Prempeh I.

Kwadwo Agyekum was succeeded by Kyei Mensah, his nephew, in the reign of Asantehene Sir Osei Agyeman Prempeh II, He was destooled. Kyei Mensah was succeeded by Nana Kwaku Duah, his brother, during the reign of Otumfuo Sir Osei Agyeman Prempeh II. Nana Akuoko Sarpong swore an oath of allegiance to the late Asantehene Otumfuo Opoku Ware II as Paramount chief of Agogo on 16th January 1976 after the demised of his uncle Nana Kwaku Duah.

 

 

Source: mybrytfmonline.com

Loading...

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button